Triage for today

When you visit google.com, there’s a big free text box encouraging you to use their core feature, search. For one of the world’s largest companies, it’s a refreshingly simple almost blank white page. That’s because they know what role they play in the world. That page is the entry point to organizing the world’s information. Search is a tool to solve a problem, just as … Continue reading Triage for today

Telehealth isn’t living up to any sort of hype.

I’ve been having lots of conversations lately with brokers, employers & health plans who finally realize that 10 min telehealth visits aren’t living up to the hype. Also, word is Teladoc is pressuring plans & brokers to increase their monthly fees paid by the group on top of the per use fees. Instead of a solution like Teladoc and the clones who can only diagnose … Continue reading Telehealth isn’t living up to any sort of hype.

The tyranny of the appointment

Forcing doctors and patients to communicate and problem solve within defined time slots forces a series of bad practices. A health issue is like anything in life. They have a beginning, a middle, and, ideally, a resolution. People need support, feedback given, and questions answered in all phases. Sometimes it’s a quick question, comment, or clarification around something weird or how to take their medication … Continue reading The tyranny of the appointment

Why most health issues can be treated online, without doctor office visits

The best doctors are exceptional detectives and masters of all the tools they have to figure out what’s wrong with you. How do they do that and what do they use to diagnose you? Here are the six main ways: They ask you questions about your symptoms (how long, what kind of pain, etc.) A physical examination of your body with a good old-fashioned poke … Continue reading Why most health issues can be treated online, without doctor office visits

Maintaining complexity, without adding value.

One day, you wake up and look around and see that 90% of everything around you is there to maintain complexity, and not add value. That’s my definition of medicalcare in America. A new study published today in JAMA looks at healthcare spending in America and concludes: Prices of labor and goods, including pharmaceuticals and devices, and administrative costs appeared to be the main drivers … Continue reading Maintaining complexity, without adding value.

Can innovation in healthcare do more harm than good?

Sure, here’s how. Say there’s a new thing called “video visit for 10 minutes with a random doctor.” A 10-minute random doctor conversation (without the ability to follow-up or order tests to confirm suspicions) is, by design, a tool to solve an extremely simple problem, like pink eye. This innovation depends on users understanding how and why they can use the tool. If the user … Continue reading Can innovation in healthcare do more harm than good?

Magic doesn’t make health happen.

Last week, I wrote about the difference between “health” and “medical.” Basically, “health” is a series of everyday choices and “medical” is pills and scalpels. The concepts are wildly different. But I get it, the medical world wants to prolong and/or return you to a state where you can make the same everyday choices. Helping you make different/better everyday choices really isn’t medical’s expertise. Here’s … Continue reading Magic doesn’t make health happen.