I just got back from Australia. Fifteen and a half hours from Melbourne to LAX. Five and a half from LAX to JFK. I spent at least 15 hours of that time on my iPad watching Mad Men, Donnie Darko, and catching up on feeds and such. And the battery still has 37% left in it. I honestly think that thing uses magic for energy.  … Continue reading

afterimg: Scientists Map Entire Brain Network: “The most complex mass of protoplasm on earth—perhaps even in our galaxy.” Our ability to understand and diagnose far outpaces our ability to do anything about that understanding…we’ll know more and more about what’s wrong with you, but we won’t be able to do anything about it. Doctors have pills and scalpels…that’s it. The FDA approved less than 10 … Continue reading

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Should software that powers implantable medical devices be open source?

Software is an integral component of a range of devices that perform critical, lifesaving functions and basic daily tasks. As patients grow more reliant on computerized devices, the dependability of software is a life-or-death issue. There is a general principle involved: that software with the ability to harm as well as help us in the physical world needs to be open to scrutiny to minimise … Continue reading Should software that powers implantable medical devices be open source?

Antarctica is on the other side of that mountain! I’m over here in Australia speaking with various government officials and business and healthcare leaders to help this continent think differently about delivering healthcare in a more effective way. Who would have thought that less than three years after starting my humble little practice in Williamsburg I’d be traveling the world helping other countries streamline how … Continue reading

Intentionally inefficient cigarette packaging concept Erik Askin recently published “Designed to Annoy: A theoretical look at designing inefficient packaging”, a thoughtful twist on the ubiquitous cigarette package. The idea of making something harder to use to encourage a user to rethink their consumption is poignant. Continue reading