@jayparkinson

15

[Steve Jobs’] role isn’t that of a designer, but rather Chief Design Advocate. This means:
- he makes it clear that products should be “insanely great”
- he recruits a top design team, and protects them from competing goals
- he is willing to spend money, adjust technology processes, all for the goal of highly desirable products
- he convinces financial analysts, industry pundits, etc. that product design is very important.

To me, the amazing part about this is: Any company can do it. Maybe not as good as Jobs, but they can decide to make it a priority – but few companies do. With the pressure of quarterly earnings, what competitors are doing, and employee aspirational desires, the focus moves off of killer experiences for customers – that’s no good.

Does every startup need a Steve Jobs? | Andrew Chen (@andrew_chen)

Interesting point by Andrew. I also love the IDEO framework he talks about earlier in the post.

(via tylerhwillis)

17
Absolutely awesome infographic produced by GE about the actual costs of common chronic diseases at various ages. This is the kind of information you as consumers need in order to understand how to best spend your healthcare dollars. Should you get a high deductible or a traditional plan? Is it better to pay more for a faceless entity to manage my healthcare usage or should I go out on my own and spend more out of pocket? Good questions…

Absolutely awesome infographic produced by GE about the actual costs of common chronic diseases at various ages. This is the kind of information you as consumers need in order to understand how to best spend your healthcare dollars. Should you get a high deductible or a traditional plan? Is it better to pay more for a faceless entity to manage my healthcare usage or should I go out on my own and spend more out of pocket? Good questions…

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Urban sprawl is not mindless at all. There is nothing inevitable about its development. Sprawl is the result of zoning laws designed by legislators, low-density buildings designed by developers, marketing strategies designed by ad agencies, tax breaks designed by economists, credit lines designed by banks, geomatics designed by retailers, data-mining software designed by hamburger chains, and automobiles designed by car designers. The interactions between all these systems and human behavior are complicated and hard to understand— but the policies themselves are not the result of chance. “Out of control” is an ideology, not a fact.
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Green Metropolis: Why Living Smaller, Living Closer, and Driving Less are the Keys to Sustainability